Stuffed Trout with Pomegranate Seeds for Rosh Hashanah

Last Updated on Wednesday, 7 September 2011 01:09 Written by Flax Monday, 5 September 2011 11:20

I love the holidays.  Yes, they are a tremendous amount of work, but they are also a wonderful time to refresh, to count our blessings, and to connect to G-d, ourselves, and to our families.  The special traditions and foods associated with the holidays always serve to remind me of my childhood and connect me to my roots.  Yet, I am no longer a child and I no longer live in the same way that I did as a child.  I live in a different country, far from where I grew up, my husband’s traditions are different from those of my father, and my children are sabras–along with everything that entails.  Like all families do, we have blended and merged and now we have new traditions that sit alongside the familiar old ones.  This is a dish which has become a tradition in our family and a way of combining both the old and the new.  Here I retain the idea of serving a stuffed fish (gefilte fish), but I no longer stuff  carp with carp but rather trout with pomegranates.  The flavor of this dish is Oriental. The spice that I use in this recipe is cardamom, the same spice commonly used in Turkish coffee and one which I naturally associate with Israel.  Thus this recipe symbolizes to me the fusion of the old and the new, where I came from as well as where I am now.  I am using the same symbols as my parents (ad meah ve’esrim) use,  but in a completely different fashion.

This dish uses two of the Rosh Hashanah symbols, the pomegranate and the fish.  The fish is a symbol of luck as well as of fertility. We serve a fish head  on Rosh Hashanah and ask to be larosh veloh lazanav (to be the head and not the tail).  Pomegranates are  eaten with the blessing sheneheye melaim mitzvot karimon (that our good deeds should be as plentiful as the seeds of the pomegranate).  Another ingredient in this recipe is pine nuts.  Some Ashkenazic Jews don’t eat any nuts on Rosh Hashanah because the hebrew numeric value for nut (egoz) is the same as the numeric value of  misdeed (chet).  Others hold that the prohibition against nuts applies only to walnuts.  If your tradition excludes all nuts then pumpkin seeds are a good alternative.

As a nutritional counselor as well as cooking instructor I always look at the health benefits of a dish as well as at the flavor. The nature of a holiday is one of excess.  Holidays are a time when we strive to reach beyond the ordinary, to set ourselves new goals, and to appreciate all that is special and holy in our lives.  While I am a big believer in reducing the amount of animal products that we eat, I think that holidays are the time to eat it.   The richness of the animal products corresponds to the general holiday atmosphere and emphasizes our celebration.  When asked to choose between animal products, fish is of course the healthiest.  Fish is the animal product that is lowest in saturated fat and cholesterol and also a source of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids.

Pomegranates are a great health choice as well. They are high in the Vitamins A, C, and E and contain folic acid, niacin and potassium.  They are rich in anti-oxidants, beneficial in healing breast and prostate cancer, help prevent hardening of the arteries and help to lower blood pressure.  They are used in remedies for bladder disturbances and are also used to strengthen gums as well as soothe ulcers of the mouth and throat.

Wishing everyone a happy and healthy New Year.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pomegranate
  • 2 fresh trout
  • olive oil
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • pinch of cardamom
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted
  • juice of 1/2 lemon

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 200C/400F.
  2. Scoop out the seeds of the pomegranate and set aside.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan and lightly fry the onions with the salt, pepper, and cardamom.
  4. Clean the fish and set on a lightly oiled ovenproof dish.
  5. Mix the fried onions with the remaining ingredients and use it to stuff the fish.  If necessary, use a toothpick to keep the trout closed.
  6. Bake for 35-40 minutes.
  7. Serve on bed of lettuce and garnish with pomegranate seeds.

Note:  To make for easier eating, ask your fish-seller if he will fillet the fish for you without removing the head.

Sima Herzfeld Navon has a clinic for holistic medicine.  She is also a cooking instructor and a nutritional counselor.

Learn More

Tu Be’shvat Pilaf

Last Updated on Monday, 23 January 2012 12:41 Written by Flax Thursday, 13 January 2011 01:27

quinoa with dried fruit and nuts

I ate this dish at  Rakel Berenbaum’s house last tu beshvat. Rakel Berenbaum is the author of Portion on the Portion, for Torah Tidbits and a highly acclaimed cook and torah scholar.   The platter that she served was gorgeous, delicious, and a conversation piece as well.

While I based my platter on her idea, I decided to do it a little bit differently. Rakel made her dish with white rice, reflecting upon the whiteness of the manna.  I chose to make my dish with quinoa instead.  If we were to follow the theme in Rakel’s dvar torah, we can say that the quinoa reflects the nutritional aspect of the manna.  Just as the manna supplied the Jewish people with all their nutritional needs in the desert, so quinoa can supply us with almost all of our nutritional needs today.  Quinoa was referred to as the “mother grain” by the Incas due to the fact that it is so high in nutrients.  Quinoa has the highest protein content of all the grains, it has more calcium than milk and it a  is a good source of iron, phosphorous, B vitamins and vitamin E.

Rice is sticky and is known for holding it’s shape.  In order for the quinoa to do this I needed to use ground  flax seed.  Flax seed works similarly to egg in that it can bind foods together and it really does work almost as well as the egg does.  It is also a much healthier alternative, cleansing the intestines and  lowering the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancers.

Additionally, I cooked the quinoa together with spices.  Some people tell me that they do not like quinoa, often it is because they are not preparing it properly.  Here are a few tips to help improve the flavor of the quinoa.

  • Always rinse the quinoa before cooking to remove the bitter coating on the outside.
  • Remove the pot from the flame before the water is completely absorbed–if you wait until the water is all absorbed you will burn your pot.  Shut the flame when you see the holes made by the steam but there is still a drop of water at the bottom.
  • Quinoa doesn’t absorb flavor or liquid after it has been cooked.  If you want your quinoa to taste like something other than plain quinoa then add the desired flavors to the cooking water.

The recipe below contains a variety of flavors and spices.  The reason why I use such of large variety of spices in this dish is to help offset all the dried fruits and nuts.  Fruits are sweet in flavor and nuts are oily.  Sweet and oily foods cause expansion and dampness (mucus) and prevent our bodies from functioning at their maximum.  Oily foods cause our  energy levels to drop (slowing down and relaxing) and sweet foods induce weight gain.  In order to balance the fruits and nuts, and to help our bodies to better digest these foods, I use a combination of warming,  pungent, and bitter spices. These spices not only add another dimension to the flavor of the food, they also help our digestive systems to work better.

Ingredients:

Olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1″ ginger, minced
1 fennel, chopped
1 cup quinoa
2 cups water
2 tbsp ground flax seed
2 tbsp pistachio seeds
turmeric
allspice
5 cardamom pods, seeds removed and crushed
salt and pepper
Variety of dried fruit, including: pineapple, apricots, prunes, craisins, figs, dates, etc.
pumpkin seeds

Heat the olive oil in a sauce pan. Sweat the onion, fennel and spices for 5 minutes, until the onion is soft.  Rinse the quinoa in a colander and add to the pot along with the remaining ingredients.  Bring to a boil, lower the flame and cook until the water is almost completely absorbed.  Remove from the flame and allow it to stand for 5 more minutes, until the water is completely absorbed.

Choose a bowl that will be completely filled by the quinoa. Brush the sides of the bowl with olive oil.

Place a dried pineapple at the bottom of the bowl and press down. Stick dried apricots in a circle around the pineapple. Put the quinoa in the bowl up to the level of the apricots and press down.

Stick a row of prunes and craisins around the bowl, cover with quinoa and press down.

Repeat the process. layering different colored fruits, (figs, dates, etc.) and pressing down on the quinoa, until the bowl is full.

Boil a cup of water in a pot. Carefully insert the bowl into the pot. Cover the pot and steam for 45 minutes. Remove the bowl from the pot and invert it onto a platter. The fruit should stick to the quinoa and you should have a beautifully decorated dome. Garnish with pumpkin seeds and serve immediately.

Serves 4-6

Sima Herzfeld Navon is a Nutritional Healer and teaches Healthy Cooking Classes.

Learn More
Copyright © 2009 Afterburner - Free GPL Template. All Rights Reserved.
WordPress is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.